Water Talkers

Flood Aware

by
Qualitycurls
Qualitycurls | Mar 24, 2015 | in Water Aware

allow nature the space and prevent building necessary infrastructure in floodplains.  seems like people complain about flooding and collapse when they should have never built their in the first place. would be great to see architecture to mitigate it as well

Eirlys Evans Mar 24, 2015

Yes, I agree that man is encroaching further onto flood plains and then is surprised when nature hits back.  The trouble is that man no longer respects nature and a profit is more important than safety. Reservoirs are built,  sometimes drowning valleys where wildlife and people are dispossessed.  The water companies are allowing millions of gallons to pour out of leaking pipes and the savings in water conservation would be fantastic if these companies behaved in a more responsible manner. The Victorians could build lasting infrastructures,  yet nowadays there appears to be built in obsolescence,  with roads, pipework and houses lasting a very short time before needing renovation. 

Janet Bradley Mar 24, 2015

I partly agree with what you say, but partly disagree.

Flooding valleys does not necessarily dispossess wildlife when reservoirs have been created. I live near the Elan Valley reservoir complex in Wales... the valleys, and the reservoirs are amazingly beautiful, the dams are even beautiful - they were built by the Victorians and the first dam is designed to look like a waterfall when it's overflowing.

The wildlife is amazing - the Visitor Centre encourages birdwatching, etc, and they ask you to return and log any unusual bird sightings.

Flooding for reservoirs is necessary - without this complex, Birmingham as a city would not be the same as it is today, as a large part of their fresh water is pumped from this reservoir complex.

The issue of leaking pipes I certainly agree with - these need to be resolved as soon as possible.

Eirlys Evans Mar 24, 2015

Hi

I wasn't  against reservoirs, just pointing out that if the water companies repaired their  infrastructures such as leaking pipes, then there would be more water available. A lot of the drains, sewers and pipework  has been neglected for decades with the resulting necessity of a huge cost to repair them.  I visited two reservoirs  in Queensland and they were beautiful. They have a lot less rain than the UK and value their water systems.

Janet Bradley Mar 24, 2015

Ah, sorry, I get your drift! 

Eirlys Evans Mar 24, 2015

Hi

I'm  glad that I've cleared up that point. Over the years there have been reports that new reservoirs  will have to built because of the rise in population. I just think that less wastage of our water should reduce the need for new ones. We are a small overpopulated island and cannot spare any more of our valleys being flooded. We can do our part by reducing our wastage, but the water providers need to stop treating their leakages as trivial. It would be great if our politicians  would stand up to them and make them use more of their profits in solving the problems. It is more complicated than that but it would help.

Andrew O'Connor Mar 25, 2015

I think the cost of reparing is putting a lot of companies off

Eirlys Evans Mar 25, 2015

Yes, it is the cost of repairs that is why they're not doing it.  The point is that they have underinvested for years.  All the utilities are forever digging up the roads and causing disruption. That is understandable, they cannot repair the countries infrastructurd without doing this.  What annoys me is when the different utilities dig up the same roads within days or weeks of each other. In other countries they plan road works so that gas, electricity, cable and water companies can use it to do any work needed on that stretch of road. This would save money and lessen the carbon footprint of the companies.  Motorists would also prefer the road to be dug up just the once instead of multiple occasions.  I know that there have to be emergency work done and this cannot be planned, but a few phone calls could reveal another utility who would appreciate defraying some of their costs by sharing the roadworks to do some of their planned work a little earlier than planned. This could be complicated, but not impossible.

Andrew O'Connor Mar 25, 2015

yeah its seems especially the past 5 years there is more roadworks and some sort of digging going on more than ever now! well now that would be common sense, unfortunately it isn't used here too often but that is the way it should be done to save a lot of time, effort and disruption to roads.

Janet Bradley Mar 25, 2015

I understand that the Mayor of London has instituted a policy to ensure road works are combined.

Janet Bradley Mar 25, 2015

Found part of the policy wording from the Mayor of London

"TfL and six major utility companies are now also signed up to the Mayor's voluntary Code of Conduct for Roadworks, which looks to promote good practice and encourage more coordinated working between utilities and highway authorities"

Surely, this needs to be in place in all areas of the UK

Louis Allen Mar 26, 2015

you have very modern and valid points snowdrop like them very much

Eirlys Evans Mar 26, 2015

Hi

I'm 74 and my points are not  really modern, I'm  going back to the days when man and nature worked together in a kind of harmony.  Not everyone or everything worked this  way because humans are fallible, but we seem to have the lost the ability to learn from nature. Working with nature usually works better than fighting. Nothing comes out of wars except death and misery, and usually it's us peasants that reap that crop!  The days when Kings and  commanders led their troops  into battle have long gone.  Back to basics is a good way to go, although it depends on who's  basics they are.  Water is a powerful ally, but a merciless enemy.

Andrew O'Connor Mar 25, 2015

can't control nature, it will end up kicking you in the bum!

Louis Allen Mar 25, 2015

very true nature is almighty powerful

Andrew O'Connor Mar 25, 2015

no matter what it is natural can take it away, we should learn to respect it and not try to build around it

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mark burns Mar 24, 2015

i agree it would make much more sense 

George Richardson Mar 24, 2015

Snowdrop as ever well reasoned,and your point on inbuilt obsolesence,the curse of modern society followed by huge corporations to extract the maximum amount from hardworking people.As for encroaching onto flood plains,without asQualitycurls said  architectural designs to not only mitigate,but overcome the problem,it is sheer madness.One can only hope as insurance becomes more and more expensive or even impossible to obtain on New Build on flood plains it stops these "criminal " developments,Of course the utilities could help by refusing to supply such developments.

George Richardson Mar 24, 2015

Nearly all Major cities,towns and even villages are built on the banks of waterways since time immarmorial for the obvious reasons. WATER. Water to drink,wash,people animals and clothes,for traders etc.and most importantly for use as trades highway.  They were planned and positioned where flooding was least if at all likely to happen.Over the centuries those principles were forgotten as villages ,towns and cities grew like topsy. Resulting in many now being on flood plains and being added to. So man in his conceit not only defies nature,but alters her causing the flooding in the first place,in many cases.  Water is not to be fooled with.

Eirlys Evans Mar 28, 2015

Hi

I've just been reading  my TV magazine and spotted a programme  on Nat George Wild (SKY 528) called Man and the wild" which is about how animals and humans can live harmoniously share water supplies.  I realised that we haven't really discussed the animals need for water, don't  know about you but I think that it is important to consider their needs. Without animals it would be a bleak world. It's not just the loss of a food source and  wool and leather, it's loss of our fellow creatures. 

Janet Bradley Mar 24, 2015

One of the biggest issues with building in flood plains is loosing soakaway areas. For example, if you look in certain areas of cities... people used to have front gardens and back gardens. But when they started to find it hard to park their multiple cars on the road, the decision came to pave over the front garden, so they could park their cars there. Then they want a nice patio out the back... so pave over portions of the back garden, put up decking, etc, and make the garden less work. I have seen this happen, and then when there has been extra rain, there is nowhere for the water to soakaway, and flood risks heightens.

Eirlys Evans Mar 26, 2015

I agree that losing gardens by paving over them has a detrimental effect on soak ways by stopping absorb tion or rainfall. This is serious, but the face of farming has changed beyond recognition in my lifetime.  Small fields have had hedges ripped out to make enormous  tracts of land. This was done in the name of progress in order to enable the use of gigantic machinery  from the USA. They have enormous tracts of land which makes sense for them to use these giants. The UK is smaller and by creating large fields, removing the hedges and clearing out the wildlife they have destroyed a way of life. The hedges soaked up the heavy rainfall rather than it running off the land into swollen rivers.  It is no coincidence  that flooding has been headlines over the last few years, with nowhere for the water to go but into the land adjacent  to the rivers. The water running off the fields also takes with it valuable top soil which then silts up the rivers making them unable to hold as much water. This is an example how links in the chains start affecting our lives. Men are not god.

Janet Bradley Mar 26, 2015

Loss of woodland is another big issue... Loads of woodland has been cut down near me recently for logging.

Eirlys Evans Mar 26, 2015

Exactly trees and hedges are vital for flood management.

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George Richardson Mar 24, 2015

The same thing is happening well away from soakaway areas too causing flash flooding.The massive growth in the past few decades of flat dwellers,, terraced house occupants,new homes built without parking provision,  nowadays most of the occupants of which can afford cars,but do not have car parking space but go somewhere.then small private estates with narrow roads and tiny gardens,may have a garage or short drive for one car,but are now multi car families etc, etc. so yes Aster1x  many gardens front and back are being cemented over . Truly becoming concrete jungles.  BY THE WAY WELCOME BACK.

Janet Bradley Mar 24, 2015

Thanks George - spent the weekend in the caravan with no internet!!! But being in caravan does make you more water aware, as any water you use, you have to carry!!

In the road I used to live in London, there were some large family homes.... with about a 1/3 of acre plot for each house. The road was near a tube station.... next thing you know, the houses are being bought up, and blocks of flats being built - the front and back gardens are being paved over for parking spaces - each flat has 2 bedrooms, and each flat has 2 parking spaces allocated (even though within 5 minute walk of tube station). These flats are at the bottom of the hill..... funnily enough the downstairs flats have flooded.. never happened to the large family houses with big gardens which were flattened to make way for these flats.

George Richardson Mar 24, 2015

Now isn;t that a surprise.Town planning at times is a joke, The new kids on the block in modern decision making  are sustainability,risk surveys unforeseen consequences.So perhaps these are some of the lessons we are constantly being told they [The Authorities ] have learned, I wonder if we will see an improvement.

Janet Bradley Mar 24, 2015

The big problem for many planning authorities is that they have been given housing targets which they have to achieve... sometimes it means that they are agreeing to certain developments, not because they are ideal, but it helps them achieve their development objectives..... it was only stopped in our road when there was a community campaign to extend the conservation area within the district!!!

Nicky Griffiths Mar 24, 2015

I don't know if anyone knows Tewkesbury, but a few years ago they built a development of new houses called "The Water Meadows". Says it all, doesn't it?!

Janet Bradley Mar 24, 2015

Classic - so how many times has it been flooded?

Nicky Griffiths Mar 24, 2015

Well, you've probably heard about the regular flooding in Tewkesbury, where the Rivers Severn and Avon meet!

Louis Allen Mar 26, 2015

omg really the water meadows 

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George Richardson Mar 24, 2015

Nicky,it does say it all. and all the ignorance and uncaring attitudes of all involved.                                       Aster1x,more of this type of fight is happening everywhere,and yet many councils have many brown field sites which are an eyesore and need development,housing as we all know being key,especially for the young However planning  often fall for the highly paid advice from the developers who do not want to endanger their profits,by helpin,g solve social problems. They want more and more green land,and bigger profits.

Janet Bradley Mar 24, 2015

They do George - in the little village where I live, there are a number of empty houses.... but the plan is to take a field and build houses on it... rather than sort out the empty houses! How will that be good for the environment, it's not good for the water resources or soakaways either.

Drives me potty!

George Richardson Mar 24, 2015

aster1x it is the same near us.Many large houses with up to an acre of land have been replaced by a dozen or so new homes,all adding to the strain on drainage. THE NUMBER PER ACRE IS KEPT LOW BECAUSE OF THE NEIGHBOURHOOD.

Janet Bradley Mar 24, 2015

Just reading the booklet that came with my water bill there is a section on "RainScape". The paragraph reads:

"Rain used to drain naturally into the ground. Now, a lot of it runs straight into our sewers from roofs, patios and drives. Every drop needs to be pumped and cleaned. And the more we all build, the more money and energy we spend returning the clean water to our rivers and seas."

This a very important point - soakaway water doesn't need to be treated.. doesn't cost so much!

George Richardson Mar 24, 2015

Unforseen Consequences,always happens.-------------------But should it,would it if they employed a team to work through the possible or probable consequences and negating them before they emerge.

Janet Bradley Mar 24, 2015

Isn't that disaster recovery scenarios?

George Richardson Mar 24, 2015

That is disaster's for what we have. i am two steps on stopping disasters that may happen on introduction of new schemes,industrial processes and scientific progression.

Andrew O'Connor Mar 25, 2015

one thing you can't and shouldn't try to do in to control natural. no matter what it will find a way through and destroy anything in its path.

Louis Allen Mar 25, 2015

your right nature is the most powerful and destructive force in the world

Andrew O'Connor Mar 25, 2015

I would never buy a house anywhere near a flood plain or somewhere were there is the potential for flooding.

Janet Bradley Mar 25, 2015

I live less than 200m from a river... but there is a steep bank and a bit of woodland in the way.. we have trouble getting building insurance as we are told we live too close to a river.... they don't look at the maps and see it's impossible for our house to flood!!

I have had trouble with people living beneath an active volcano - like people living in Naples is right in the path of another eruption of Vesuvius - haven't they learnt anything from Pompeii!! I find it easier to cope with the thought of living on a flood plain if there was no other option. But I would prefer not to.

George Richardson Mar 25, 2015

At this time in our history,one of the greatest challengers for our young people is the need for a home. Housing is going to become a huge issue,and in the next decade the biggest biulding program since the late 40,s early 50's is going to have to be undertaken  Planning this will need massive cooperation from the whole industry,government local and national.THE FIRST PRIORITY   will be to find the land,which i believe is there in brown field sit provision. THE SECOND PRIORITY,  should be  that no housing to be built on designated flood plain land,or any area with a history of flooding.

Janet Bradley Mar 25, 2015

Where I live there are a stack of houses which are empty... but many people today don't know how to maintain houses... so they don't want an old one, they want a new one... another product of the throwaway society that we live in.

Louis Allen Mar 26, 2015

very true the amount of unused products that are just thrown everywhere is disgusting

Eirlys Evans Mar 26, 2015

Hi

It is interesting about the older houses that nobody wants.  I have seen several instances where local councils  have sold them to first time buyers for a pittance.  They then have to renovate them and agree to live in them for a set amount of time. Some councils also lend the purchasers  the money to do them up at a reasonable amount of  interest. This is important because they would find it difficult to get mortgages  on the properties until they are in a good condition. This is a fantastic opportunity for young people to get their own homes if they are prepared to work at it.  The older houses were built to last and are often more spacious than new builds.

Andrew O'Connor Mar 25, 2015

yes I agree, the demand for housing is massive now, especially for new builds for 1st time buyers. I would never move to an area that was in danger of flooding no matter how nice the area or house is

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George Richardson Mar 25, 2015

Snowdrop as ever you make brilliant points about roadworks. I would go further than you however with your suggestions for cooperation.  I would make it Mandatory on all utilities,for each area ,size of which to be decided mutually amongst them,to have all the work needed in that area by all put together and a schedule worked out so eveyone efforts are co-ordinated.This would put the least pressure on our roads and traffic flow.Never mind the cost of continuing road repairs.Weather itself is putting a huge strain on road repair budgets without all this needless digging by utilities.

Andrew O'Connor Mar 25, 2015

would be great for them to work together to avoid disruption.

Eirlys Evans Mar 25, 2015

I would like to make it mandatory, but don't like cohersion being used if it is possible to use persuasion.  The utilities etc should  embrace cooperation because it should save money  and keep bills down for us. I must admit that cynical me doesn't really think that we would profit by it, but their shareholders would. Perhaps that's the  way to tackle them, aim for the jugular!  Shareholders want their profits to go up, so they would gain, the company's  carbon footprint could be reduced  and the motorist wouldn't have to  tear their hair out as much.  Oh for the perfect world!!!!

Janet Bradley Mar 25, 2015

Hi Snowdrop, I made a comment further up this post - see comment below - it works in some places.. so why doesn't it in all places.

 

Found part of the policy wording from the Mayor of London

"TfL and six major utility companies are now also signed up to the Mayor's voluntary Code of Conduct for Roadworks, which looks to promote good practice and encourage more coordinated working between utilities and highway authorities"

Surely, this needs to be in place in all areas of the UK

Eirlys Evans Mar 25, 2015

Yes it is great that they have begun on the "road" to cooperation, I hope that it spreads very quickly.

Janet Bradley Mar 25, 2015

I think that this policy has been in place now for about 4-5 years... so its established.. how its working, I don't know as I no longer live in London. But, I don't know if any city councils have signed up for this type of policy too... it should be adopted by all.

Eirlys Evans Mar 25, 2015

I agree

Louis Allen Mar 26, 2015

i am quite surprised this is not implemented nearly everywhere

Eirlys Evans Mar 25, 2015

Hi George

I forgot to say that perhaps if they repaired the roads properly, instead of patching them up, they would last longer. I'm not  an expert on roads, I don't  even drive, but where they have several patched up stretches it seems to me that it quickly deteriorates. I wondered whether rain and frost seeped in around the edges, and then it caused the road to disintegrate.  Perhaps we have a member who can inform us what the situation is?

Janet Bradley Mar 25, 2015

On that point Snowdrop... in the Mayor of London policy I have noted, there is also a section on the quality of the repair - if it's not up to scratch, they are asking for the public to actively report this and this ensures that the companies don't do shoddy work!

Eirlys Evans Mar 25, 2015

Thanks for that. I think that it is about time that shoddy work is unacceptable  and the firm's made to put it right at their own expense.  

Janet Bradley Mar 25, 2015

Also the policy includes not taking up too much road than absolutely necessary, and also being on site and working all the time that roads are inconvenienced.... I think that these type of policies are absolutely essential in order for water companies and energy companies not to get a bad name for themselves.... its a shame that they have to be "policed" though!

Eirlys Evans Mar 25, 2015

Very true, but they do need to be policed.

Louis Allen Mar 26, 2015

very valid point snowdrop 

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George Richardson Mar 25, 2015

Exactly the point we are making.

George Richardson Mar 25, 2015

Snowdrop your contributions up to there usual high standard.

George Richardson Mar 25, 2015

aster1x thanks for the information on the mayors initiative. As you say it has been intrain for a few years. Are there any reports on any improvements,speed all utilities finish,improvement in road repairs etc. Have we heard from the utilities on benefits to them and the public and are they going to try and roll it out Nationwide. If they did it should go a long way to finding and repairing WATER LEEKS.

Janet Bradley Mar 25, 2015

Hi George

Found out this information

  • An increase of 147 per cent in the number of recorded days of disruption saved through joint working and collaboration
  •  A 25% reduction in the hours of serious and severe congestion caused by planned road works in 2010/11 compared to 2009/10 across London

 A reduction in the total number of works undertaken by utilities of 17% within permitting authorities as compared to only 7% in non-permitting authorities, saving approximately 149,136 days of streetworks within those authorities

 

George Richardson Mar 25, 2015

Agree about avoiding volcanoes but should avoid flood plains too.If you can not insure,your life can be destroyed anytime,and many are living in fear.

Janet Bradley Mar 25, 2015

we have found a company that will insure us... took a while though!

Louis Allen Mar 26, 2015

I could imagine it was expensive too

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George Richardson Mar 25, 2015

Aoc27 you make the point well, it is sheer stupidity to go against nature.

Louis Allen Mar 26, 2015

nature is way too powerful force

George Richardson Mar 25, 2015

aster1x  Those saving figures are amazing. The wasteage nationwide all things taken into account must run into many Billions. If the utilities do not unite in this way Nationwide,it is a National disgrace and an online petition should be started. If Jeremy Clarkson can get a million ,surely a campaign to get the government to legislate for this should with publicity get 30,40 million 

Janet Bradley Mar 25, 2015

I have been wondering if the policies are there... we just don't know it.... I was aware of the policies in London because Boris Johnson made a big fuss about it and made sure it was advertised in the Evening Standard newspaper.

I have just driven to my nearest town and back... BT Openreach cabling still going on... but I notice that they don't stay overnight. They pack up each night and don't leave the lights on... I don't recall seeing any roadworks involving Welsh Water since I've been here.

The only roadworks that are continuous are the ones run by the council - I have noted one road that there have been lights in place and "work going on" for 2 years now.

So, I wonder if the utilities are using better policies, but they are just not adequately advertised.

Janet Bradley Mar 25, 2015

I am now going to think of another point on this subject - LEAD!!

Lead used to be used in water pipes.. in fact in some properties, you may still find the house has lead pipes. I don't know if the utility companies still have any lead pipes in their network.... I would much prefer if roads were dug up and lead pipes replaced with the pipes which won't make me ill!

My brother got lead poisoning... it wasn't funny!

Louis Allen Mar 26, 2015

really aster 1x lead pipes now wonder he was very ill its awful stuff

George Richardson Mar 25, 2015

Still plenty of lead pipes in older properties,i doubt the utilities have much,but you are right to mention it and i am sure there is still some somewhere.

Hannah Smith Mar 25, 2015

It infuriates me when new homes are built on floodplains and then everyone wonders why it floods?!?! 

Louis Allen Mar 26, 2015

some poeple and companies have no common sense

 

Hannah Smith Mar 27, 2015

Money matters more.. it's a risk to buy a house there simply because many insurance companies won't insure you for flood damage.

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George Richardson Mar 25, 2015

 It is amazing how much stupidity exists in those we rely on.OR WORSE.

George Richardson Mar 26, 2015

ONCE AGAIN Snowdrop,bang on. No men are not God,and we try to alter hia desigs at our peril.At one time Britain was mostly forested,and have no doubt that a lot of the flood plains that now exist are because man removed most of them. Trees are very thirsty beasts.But i had completely overlooked how since the50[s thousands of miles of hedgerow have been ripped out for larger fields and greater "efficiency"Leading hs you pointed out the destruction of wildlife,and massive run off of rainfall,swelling rivers,silting them up with valuable top soil and masses of chemicals,which killed off river life. Thank goodness this practice seems to have stopped.With specialised farming some hedgerows are being replaced,and wild margins left untouched along the field sides beginning slowly to reverse the damage.

Eirlys Evans Mar 28, 2015

Yes, George at last they are realising that you  can't  manage land on an relatively small  island in the same manner that you can on the  enormous plains in America.  Ecological factors also come into consideration.  Hedges shaped our landscape and the flora and fauna that were suited to those conditions.  The wildlife that were familiars sights in my youth are very thin on the ground nowadays. 

George Richardson Mar 27, 2015

You are right,Money Matters,but it is really the greed of the people developing these policies.I  will bet a minimum of 60% of policy holders in any one year never make any claim,and many more less than their premium leaving the companies ,like Banks with huge profits. Money Matters not people.

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Hannah Smith Mar 28, 2015

I agree George. Unfortunately we all pay for someone else's just in case.

George Richardson Mar 28, 2015

Don't we just.

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George Richardson Mar 28, 2015

Hi,dear friend,your Reference to "Man in the Wild" and our love and need for animals in our world one would think would be for everyone,but for many people they never know what they have until they lose it. i Think if you had the few hours it would now take to read all the posts on this site,we have talked about this several times.

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George Richardson Mar 28, 2015

I used to go to a local beauty spot as a youth on a regular basis, with a view for miles. Lying there soaking in the sun,you could always  hear and looking up see 1,2 or even 3 Sky Larks,as they sang their beautiful song as they ascended step by step into the blue. Farming practice changed and they vanished.

Eirlys Evans Mar 28, 2015

Yes, I know what you mean.  I went to live in the countryside when I was 12 and I knew little about it.  I was crossing a field  on my way home from school  when I found a tiny abandoned rabbit. Thinking that I could save it I carried home hugging it to keep it safe. When my father saw it he explained that it was a leveret and it's  mother had given birth there and would have been watching nearby. I offered to put it back but was told that because my scent was on it, his mother would reject it. I was devastated  to think that that it would die so tried to  look after it, although my father said that it would die. I HENRY didn't  die and grew into a gorgeous  hare. He followed me everywhere and I adored him.  The following March he got very restless and because it was the mating season I was advised to release him. It broke my heart to lose him, but when I returned  him to the original field in which I found him he lope away.  I watched watched for him every day and he reappeared  for several days with a smaller hare by his side. I was happy that he had  found a mate and would have his own family, but Henry still holds a place in my heart. I wonder how many children  even in the country has seen a hare nowadays.  Oh the fickleness of the male species! 

George Richardson Mar 28, 2015

Henry was not being fickle, just leaving home after Mother had raised him to maturity. And you know what Duke Wayne said. A man has to do what a man has to do.  Do you think as they say we're being a little naughty ,and well off piste.

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Eirlys Evans Mar 28, 2015

Yes I know that he had to go it was his nature, and as has been stated many times in these posts, nature is extremely  strong. I could have kept him in a cage but that would have  been cruel. I liked thinking about him running freely, but I stilled missed him.  I was very  privileged to  have as my friend for nearly a year and even losing him it was worth the joy that he gave me. I suppose that I was his mum for that time and a proud one at that.

George Richardson Mar 28, 2015

Just think of all those Leverets since, you are now a Great--------------------============ Grand mother

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George Richardson Mar 30, 2015

We have spent a lot of thought on saving water,stopping flooding,and improving or saving our ecosystem. Well hear is one that in it's own small way can do all. PEETLANDS or toplands  The expansive moorlands in our nation.hold billions of gallons of water,which helps to stop flooding when much rain drops on these high regions and not on more susceptible areas. This water reaches streams and rivers at a far steadier and acceptable rate.THIS PRESERVES THE WATER FOR USE FOR AN EXTENDED PERIOD..Thus saving water and alleviating floods.     Next post.

George Richardson Mar 30, 2015

The peet  is formed over  decades and decades of growth,dye back,water and compression. Within that peet are millions of cubic feat of greenhouse gases which help protect our atmosphere.This is released when peet is dug up for human use. Not by individuals but on an industrial scale.as is happening today.in a way not recognised by politicians as adding to our carbon footprint as a Nation.    SO my plea to all you gardeners and other peet uses stop.  Use compost,or circulate what you grow where etc. Thus protecting our peetlands.

Qualitycurls Mar 31, 2015

Interesting to hear about peat!  I've been trying coir in lieu of peat the last couple of years and it amazes me how hard it is to find and peat so abundant in the garden centres!

George Richardson Mar 30, 2015

Did you know this Fact.Successive governments have neglected flood defences to such an extent that when the 2007 floods struck,only half were in good condition.So all the reducing amount they keep telling us they are still spending will be lucky to stem the overall decline.                                                                                           Governments first duty to it;s citizens is to defend  them from external and internal  threats.    What a hoot that is. They have all these departments spending billions and are on top of nothing. Except hot air and deceipt by omission.

George Richardson Mar 31, 2015

Thanks for telling people about coir as an alternative. Harder to find,well they just can not rob our heritage fot it.  Money money monet it's a rich mans world/

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George Richardson Mar 31, 2015

FACT UPDATE. Since W.W.2. New housing covering a land mass the size of the West Midlands has been built on land  "Prone to Inundation "Known but allowed through the planning system . Whle at an increasing rate the awareness of future flooding has grown and still no plans are being put forward.

George Richardson Mar 31, 2015

ONLY 7% OF Local Authorities have plans for coping with Climate Change and none have started implementation.                                                                                                                                                            87% of top companies believe they are exposed to the risks of Global Warming and non have done anything for possible alleviation.                                                                                                                            6% only of people living on flood plains have done anything to protect their properties. 

George Richardson Mar 31, 2015

The former Chief Scientist to the government Sir David King,estimated the cost of flood damage at  2 Billion approximately with the latest floods rising to 25 Billion by 2080, or before.

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