Water Talkers

Times change

by
Nicky Griffiths
Nicky Griffiths | Mar 6, 2015 | in Think Water

When I was young there was no need to save water, we didn't have water meters and we never heard about water shortages. Since having a water meter, I save water because I have to pay for it, but also for environmental reasons in the same way that I recycle as much rubbish as possible. The people who don't save water are probably the same ones who don't save gas and electricity. The big bills should be enough to deter people, but some people seem to have money to waste! I think the solution lies in education, if people learn to do something from an early age it becomes a lifelong habit, also they would be taught the reasons that there is not an endless supply of water.

Nicky Griffiths Mar 6, 2015

When I stayed with my elderly mother a couple of years ago, I used to tell her not to wash her cup & saucer every time she had a drink. She replied that she did not have a water meter - even though she was very inteligent she didn't understand the need to save water.

George Richardson Mar 6, 2015

I was always taught you never wash a teapot only rinse it.,the tanning that builds up enhances the taste.Your elderly mother in contrast to this elderly grandad,washes her cup every time,while i dont even rinse the inside just cleaning the outside.The stains soon build as does the taste,but it doesn't look great Saves water but not scolding from my daughters,when they call and then proceed to scald my mug.

Nicky Griffiths Mar 6, 2015

George, I do wash my teapot and mugs, but the stains still build up over time! Occasionally I use salt to give the mugs a good clean, I don't like strong tea!

Andrew O'Connor Mar 8, 2015

hmm interesting about using salt to clean mugs, never heard of that, good tip.

Nicky Griffiths Mar 8, 2015

Yes, you just rub salt on the stains and they disappear!

Andrew O'Connor Mar 8, 2015

i will have to start doing this. 

Louis Allen Mar 9, 2015

Vinegar or bicarbonate of soda is great for cleaning

Andrew O'Connor Mar 9, 2015

they are great cleaning tools as well. very useful for other things. vinegar has so much uses for other things too.

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Janet Bradley Mar 6, 2015

Good point about how we are being educated to recycle... where I live now we are encouraged to recycle a lot... it's all down to changing times and reasons being provided to recycle - like images of land fills. Paying for plastic bags, etc. So, the same concepts need to be applied to the saving of water.

Andrew O'Connor Mar 8, 2015

i think more needs to be done to put it out there and tell them what we are talking about. it could be a simple advert on the tv or a short informative leaflet showing why looking after our water is so important. we may think why should i save when many others are wasting but it is our responsibility to make sure look after the earth's resources before it is too late.

Nicky Griffiths Mar 8, 2015

Good idea but the water companies wouldn't be too happy with this, I'm sure they are delighted when people use lots of water as it's all profit for them!!

Andrew O'Connor Mar 8, 2015

fair point, i think a good balance is needed because at the end of the day they are the ones who need to protect the water we need so hopefully the preservation of water is top of the list compared to profit.

Louis Allen Mar 8, 2015

Agreed the bosses must be earning quite alot

Andrew O'Connor Mar 9, 2015

hopefully the money doesn't affect their passion for the job thinking about how much they get paid instead of doing the right thing for their region.

Louis Allen Mar 9, 2015

especially the bosses

View all replies (5)

Gina LoBuglio Mar 8, 2015

aster1x has built on this point very well when speaking about recycling and in fact, it's something that my colleagues and I had discussed when thinking about water education. It's hard to even cast my mind back to a time when I wasn't recycling everything but it has, in fact, only happened within my adulthood whereas my teenage son has only ever known to recycle. People's mindsets change with education and although it is a gradual process, it's one worth starting now and from a young age if possible.

George speaks about learning from his mother about not washing the teapot, aoc27 suggests TV adverts - anyone have any other ideas about how to get the message across about saving water? What about rolling out a programme for schools? From nursery age up until secondary and sixth form?

 

 

Andrew O'Connor Mar 9, 2015

its best to learn when you are young and then it will become natural when you are grown up as it will stick with you. i really think with all the other thoughts and comments education in schools would be a major step in teaching about water and the importance of it and they can maybe go home and tell their parents what they learnt and pass it on :)

your parents play a big part so if they are leading by example and pass on thier values to their children this would put them in good stead for the future of looking after things.

TV adverts should be made as well to highlight the importance of water and they can make it fun and interesting and have a character e.g. aquaman who will come to the rescue and show you how to save water :)

Nicky Griffiths Mar 8, 2015

Last week my Granddaughter's nursery had a visit from a Policewoman to talk about road safety and "stranger danger", maybe someone from the water industry could do similar visits at regular intervals to remind children of all ages about the importance of saving water.

Andrew O'Connor Mar 9, 2015

good point Nicky, great to have someone come in and talk to them.

Louis Allen Mar 8, 2015

thats quite a unique idea

George Richardson Mar 8, 2015

The point you and your colleagues have discussed and you reported is well made.That sea shift occured in smoking,yet somehow seems to be growing again in the young.However it seems to be happening in Drink,this time with the young ones leading the way,and us "oldies" being the culprits. Ther's nowt queerer than folk.

George Richardson Mar 8, 2015

Many schools have visits from police,firemen baners etc.etc. even M.P.'s.but i will in my own small way bring it ip at governors meetings.or with the heads All local heads meet evert few weeks ,maybe as a body they could lobby the waterboards. You parents out there talk to your heads.yOU WILL FIND MOST OF THEM VERY WELLCOMING AND APPRECTATIVE.

Nicky Griffiths Mar 8, 2015

I think children take more notice if somebody "special" comes in from outside, rather than just hearing it from their teachers.

Andrew O'Connor Mar 9, 2015

i think most people would welcome a positive approach to water

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Gina LoBuglio Mar 8, 2015

Hi Nicky Griffiths, I agree about the somebody 'special' angle but it probably works more so when the children are younger. I think that the water companies might have to pitch the campaign slightly differently depending on the target - so perhaps a water mascot of some sort (anyone fancy dressing up as a massive drop of water?!) for young children, posters with gross (but science-based) photos and facts on them to be posted in loos at secondary schools, etc. Obviously those are just some rough and off-the-cuff thoughts but you get the idea.

Andrew O'Connor Mar 9, 2015

Aqua man to the rescue :) could make it interesting the kids and learn facts about water and how much it takes to fill a bath etc and have fun games, defo needs to be done across the UK.

Amy Hunter Mar 9, 2015

I think there must have been a water shortage when I was a primary school (70's) . I remember quite clearly having to draw posters to encourage people to turn of the taps when brushing and having showers not baths. ( I don't think we even had a shower at the time) and not using sprinklers. This must definitely have worked as these are probably the first to mind water-saving tactics for me- I have no idea whether these are actually the most wasteful activities or not but they are the first things that come to mind.

Nicky Griffiths Mar 9, 2015

I think people do a lot more wasteful things than that, particularly with hosepipes, but every little helps. I've just been thinking about how the local council ask us to rinse out cans, bottles etc. before putting them in the recycling bin. It's not always possible to do this with waste water. I've heard that everything gets jet-washed when it gets to the recycling centre, but it goes against my nature to put dirty things in the bin when the council ask us not to. How does everyone else feel about this?

Andrew O'Connor Mar 9, 2015

yeah i always wash tins and cans etc because the council advises to wash it out before but if they wash it at the recycling centre i would be quite annoyed that we are wasting water doing this if they do it anyway!i always think that if it is too dirty/not washed that they may not accept the recycle bin which i don't watnt

Andrew O'Connor Mar 9, 2015

good that your primary school done their bit to help educate children

View all replies (3)

Louis Allen Mar 9, 2015

to clean everything takes alot more wastage of water which cant be good

George Richardson Mar 9, 2015

Rinsing cans boesn't have to take a lot of water.If one can a quqrter full ahd swirled round,two to three cans,half full,swirltransfer to next can etc.till all done. Saves the garbage from smelling and attracting unwanted attention.

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